Students Entering Grade 6: Required Summer Reading List

2019

Choose your title and complete your assignment! 

Click here for the Notes for September Book Discussion worksheet.

  • "Among the Hidden" by Margaret Peterson Haddix
    In a future where the Population Police enforce the law limiting a family to only two children, Luke has lived all his twelve years in isolation and fear on his family’s farm, until another “third” convinces him that the government is wrong.
     
  • "Behind Rebel Lines: The Incredible Story of Emma Edmonds, Civil War Spy" by Seymour Reit
    In 1861, when war erupted between the States, President Lincoln made an impassioned plea for volunteers. Determined not to remain on the sidelines, Emma Edmonds cropper her hair, donned men’s clothing, and enlisted in the Union Army. Posing in turn as a slave, peddler, and washerwoman, Emma became a cunning master of disguise, risking discovery and death at every turn behind Confederate lines.
     
  • "Chasing Lincoln’s Killer" by James L. Swanson
    This nonfiction novel is a fast-paced thriller that gives readers a behind the scenes look at the pursuit and capture of John Wilkes Booth by giving a day-by-day account of the wild chase to find this killer and his accomplices. Not only do you look at the assassination of a president, this book shows readers Abraham Lincoln the man, the father, the husband, the friend and how his death impacted those closest to him.
     
  • "Escape!: The Story of the Great Houdini" by Sid Fleischman 
    The book follows the unusual chronology beginning with Houdini’s humble beginnings in Appleton, Wisconsin. It then follows him through his early struggles and failures, his marriage to Bess, and his rise to fame as the greatest magician of them all. This account emphasizes Houdini’s remarkable showmanship and incredible determination.
     
  • "Hatchet" by Gary Paulsen
    After a plane crash, thirteen-year-old Brian spends fifty-four days in the Canadian wilderness, learning to survive with only the aid of a hatchet given him by his mother, and learning also to survive his parents’ divorce.
     
  • "Hoot" by Carl Hiassen
    It involves new kids, bullies, alligators, eco-warriors, pancakes, and pint-sized owls. A hilarious Floridian adventure! Roy, who is new to his small Florida community, becomes involved in another boy's attempt to save a colony of burrowing owls from a proposed construction site.
     
  • "How They Croaked: The Awful Ends of the Awfully Famous" by Georgia Bragg
    Over the course of history, men and women have lived and died. In fact, getting sick and dying can be a big, ugly mess — especially before the modern medical care that we all enjoy today. From King Tut's ancient autopsy to Albert Einstein's great brain escape, How They Croaked contains all the gory details of the awful ends of nineteen awfully famous people.
     
  • "Maniac Magee" by Jerry Spinelli
    Jeffrey Lionel "Maniac" Magee might have lived a normal life if a freak accident hadn't made him an orphan. After living with his unhappy and uptight aunt and uncle for eight years, he decides to run — and not just run away, but run. This is where the myth of Maniac Magee begins as he changes the lives of a racially divided small town with his amazing and legendary feats. 
     
  • "Miracle on 49th Street" by Mike Lupica
    Josh Cameron is MVP of the championship Boston Celtics and a media darling with a spotless reputation. He has it all...including a daughter he never knew. When twelve-year-old Molly Parker arrives in his life, claiming to be his daughter, she catches him off guard. Together, these two strangers learn that sometimes, for things to end up the way you want them to, you have to fire up a prayer at the buzzer and hope it goes in.
     
  • "Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH" by Robert C. O’Brien
    Mrs. Frisby, a widowed mouse with four small children, is faced with a terrible problem. She must move her family to their summer quarters immediately, or face almost certain death. But her youngest son, Timothy, lies ill with pneumonia and must not be moved. Fortunately, she encounters the rats of NIMH, an extraordinary breed of highly intelligent creatures, who come up with a brilliant solution to her dilemma. And Mrs. Frisby in turn renders them a great service.
     
  • "My Side of the Mountain" by Jean Craighead George
    Young Sam Gribley lives a comfortable life in New York City. But tired of urban living, he, with his parents' knowledge, runs away to the Catskills Mountains, determined to live on the site of his great-grandparents' old homestead. Leaving the city with few possessions, he sets off on the adventure of a lifetime. His initial nights on the mountain prove difficult as he struggles to stay warm and find food. Eventually, Sam adjusts, learns much about himself and becomes a true backwoodsman, eating off the land, making deerskin clothes, hollowing out the base of a large tree to live in and becoming part of the wilderness environment. He steals a baby peregrine falcon from its nest and adopts the bird he names Frightful. They become inseparable as Frightful helps his new 'parent' hunt for food. This is a richly detailed book, filled with tales about living off the land. Nonetheless, it requires much suspension of disbelief concerning Sam's impressive, albeit somewhat implausible, ability to survive alone in the wilderness and his parents' willingness to let him do so. Still, this award-winning book has much to appeal to young readers searching for literary adventures.
     
  • "When You Reach Me" by Rebecca Stead 
    When You Reach Me is a Newbery Medal-winning science fiction and mystery novel by Rebecca Stead, published in 2009. It takes place in the Upper West Side of New York City during 1978 and 1979 and follows the protagonist, Miranda Sinclair. After her apartment key is stolen, she receives a strange note. The notes keep coming from someone who knows things that no one should know because they haven’t happened yet. She must solve this mysterious puzzle before it’s too late.
     
  • "The Witches" by Roald Dahl
    Would you know a real witch if you saw one? They don’t ride broomsticks. They don’t wear black capes or pointy hats. In fact, they don’t look like witches at all. But one thing is certain: A real witch is the most dangerous of all living creatures. So you’d better learn to know one when you see one! The young hero of this award-winning story learns that lesson in a hurry when he encounters a whole gruesome gang of them. He’ll need all his wits about him to foil their wicked scheme—a dastardly plot to rid the world of children forever! 
     
  • "A Wrinkle in Time" by Madeleine L’Engle 
    Winner of the Newbery Medal in 1963, L’Engle’s work of fantasy and science fiction tells the story of Meg Murry, her extraordinary little brother Charles Wallace, and schoolmate Calvin O’Keefe. Together they journey through a wrinkle in time, to rescue the Murry’s missing father from an evil presence, and a sinister brain called IT. Although this is science fiction, the characters are portrayed realistically and sympathetically.

 

Click here for the Notes for September Book Discussion worksheet.